The exhibition in the Library

The exhibition in Droitwich Library is the final event of the ArtsFest 2017. 24 artists showed their works in various media. More »

ArtsFest 2017

ArtsFest 2017 was a great success. It is the first big event that DAN has organised with multiple activities, exhibitions, concerts and guest performers over 3 weeks period, and the programme was accepted well by the audience. More »

The Best in Show at Hanbury Hall

A beautiful painting ‘Royal Scot 66113 Cameronian’ by Kenneth Robinson was voted by visitors as the best artwork. More »

DAN annual exhibition at Hanbury Hall

Each year DAN members hold an annual exhibition in the prestigious venue, Long Gallery at Hanbury Hall. More »

Handel\\\'s Water Music

Droitwich Spa celebrated Handel\\\'s Water Music with a concert and historical reenactment. More »

DAN members artwork selection

DAN members are very diverse in their artistic expressions - there are the excellent watercolourists, oil painters, photographers... More »

 

Newsletter: August 2015

news August

The full newsletter for August 2015 you can download clicking the button below.

Newsletter August 2015

Mail Art Exhibition

mail art poster 1Droitwich Spa Salt Fest started in 2006 to celebrate the town’s unique salt heritage. Since then the event has grown considerably taking place across the whole town centre and attracting thousands of visitors.

Droitwich Arts Network (DAN) invites member artists to participate in the Mail Art Exhibition that will be part of 2015  Salt Festival programme (12 – 13 September). Similarly, Les Amis des Arts de Voiron invites DAN members to respond in like manner. The aim of the project is to connect artists from Droitwich Spa with fellow artists from twin town. Feel free to introduce yourself through your artistic expression. We are looking forward to seeing your works.

“Mail art (also known as Postal art and Correspondence art) is a populist artistic movement centered on sending small scale works through the postal service. It initially developed out of the Fluxus movement in the 1950s and 60s, though it has since developed into a global movement that continues to the present.” (Wikipedia)

800 Years Celebration of King John’s Droitwich Royal Charter

Droitwich Salt Slaves

serf -1By Alan Davey

In 1215 slavery had nearly disappeared in England. This was due to the attitude of the church, who ruled people’s minds in the 13th century. The bishop of Worcester banned the exporting of slaves and so did William the Conqueror at the port of Bristol. The Norman’s feudal system did not need slavery; it had serfdom.

In spite of this, Droitwich, then known as Wich, was an unusual place. It had a concentration of unskilled workers working around the clock in shifts, cutting wood, feeding furnaces, continually stirring salt out of boiling brine, and transporting the salt by packhorse. It was a densely populated industrial centre of workers performing difficult and dangerous tasks night and day in a very dirty and smokey environment – a rare thing in England at that time. Due to the poor condition of the roads, salt manufacture in Wich could only be achieved during the summer months. In those days, salt was essential for preserving food; without it folk would starve during the winter.

King John’s Royal Charter Day in Droitwich

Royal SealBy Royal Seal the citizens of the Town Wich, known as Droitwich, are commanded to attend and witness the Royal Charter presentation ceremony and festivities.

The Royal Charter was signed by King John in Bridgenorth on August 1st 1215, about seven weeks after signing the Magna Carta on 15th June 1215. Four or five merchants from Wich, headed by the elected Reeve (chief), was granted an audience and knowing that John was desperately in need of money, struck a bargain that benefited both parties. The king let at the yearly rental of £100 (over £100,000 in today’s money) all his royal rights to the town of Wich.